Global market for officers and crew

The Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO) www.bimco.org estimate a seafaring workforce of 624000 officers and 747000 ratings in 2010[1]. BIMCO/ISF (2010).  OECD countries and the Far East supply close to 60 per cent of officers and an additional 20 per cent are East Europeans. Nearly 37 per cent of the ratings come from Far East.  BIMCO is located in Denmark and develop standardises contracts used in the freight and newbuilding markets.  The international labour organisation estimated slightly less (1, 2 mill seafarers) in the 1920s.  T    his is another indication of the much higher productivity in the current fleet, as both cargo volume and distances has increased substantially since the 1920s.  

 

 

 

 

Picture 16

  .

Figure 13:  Seafarers by Area of Domicile in 2010 excluding catering and hotel staff. (‘000 seafarers)

Source BIMCO/ISF (2010, 1)

http://www.marisec.org/shippingfacts/worldtrade/world-seafarers.php

 

 

In 2008 Drewry (2008) http://www.marinebenefits.no/visartikkel.asp?art=268 estimated the shortfall of officers to be 34000 officers. They expect the shortfall to increase to 84000 officers by 2012.  The age structure especially for officers from the west and from Japan explains this rising shortfall.  BIMCO (2010) estimate demand for officers at 637 000 and for ratings 747 000 implying that there is a 2 per cent excess demand for officers and a balanced situation for ratings.  The recruitment situation thus does not seem as severe as in 2005, which as BIMCO comments is probably an effect of the economic downturn and contraction of seaborne transport following this. http://www.marisec.org/Manpower%20Study.pdf

    Picture 17Picture 18

   

Figure  14a) Age structure OECD officers, 14b): Age structure Far East Officers

Source:  Source BIMCO/ISF (2005, 5)

BIMCO/ISF Manpower 2005 update summary.   (ISF international shipping Federation) http://www.marisec.org/resources/Manpower2005UpdateSUMMARY.pdf

 

In 2001 The Maritime Labour Convention http://www.ilo.org/global/What_we_do/InternationalLabourStandards/
MaritimeLabourConvention/lang--en/index.htm
  was initiated (ILO, 2006) and was adopted in 2006.  It will come into force when it is ratified by 30 countries with at least 33 per cent of world gross tonnage (GT).  The convention was assumed to be ratified by 2011, but in 2012 28 countries have ratified the convention and thus it is not yet in force.

 

MLC will replace the current numerous international conventions that govern seafarer’s employment, standard of living and working conditions, health and safety, payment and repatriation. As stated by ILO “MLC once it enters into force, will be the “fourth pillar” of the international regulatory regime for quality shipping, complementing the key Conventions of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) such as the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended (SOLAS), the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch keeping, 1978, as amended (STCW) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 73/78 (MARPOL). http://www.ilo.org/global/What_we_do/InternationalLabourStandards/
MaritimeLabourConvention/lang--en/index.htm
.  These and other conventions are presented in



[1] These numbers are based on STCW certificates and are therefore somewhat broader and not directly comparable to earlier studies.

In 2008 Drewry (2008) http://www.marinebenefits.no/visartikkel.asp?art=268 estimated the shortfall of officers to be 34000 officers. They expect the shortfall to increase to 84000 officers by 2012. The age structure especially for officers from the west and from Japan explains this rising shortfall. BIMCO (2010) estimate demand for officers at 637 000 and for ratings 747 000 implying that there is a 2 per cent excess demand for officers and a balanced situation for ratings. The recruitment situation thus does not seem as severe as in 2005, which as BIMCO comments is probably an effect of the economic downturn and contraction of seaborne transport following this. http://www.marisec.org/Manpower%20Study.pdf

In 2001 The Maritime Labour Convention http://www.ilo.org/global/What_we_do/InternationalLabourStandards/MaritimeLabourConvention/lang--en/index.htm was initiated (ILO, 2006) and was adopted in 2006. It will come into force when it is ratified by 30 countries with at least 33 per cent of world gross tonnage (GT). The convention was assumed to be ratified by 2011, but in 2012 28 countries have ratified the convention and thus it is not yet in force.

MLC will replace the current numerous international conventions that govern seafarer’s employment, standard of living and working conditions, health and safety, payment and repatriation. As stated by ILO “MLC once it enters into force, will be the “fourth pillar” of the international regulatory regime for quality shipping, complementing the key Conventions of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) such as the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended (SOLAS), the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch keeping, 1978, as amended (STCW) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 73/78 (MARPOL). http://www.ilo.org/global/What_we_do/InternationalLabour
Standards/MaritimeLabourConvention/lang--en/index.htm
. These and other conventions are presented in section 1.3.5.